January 2010 Archives

‘Harvard Beats Yale’ ably manages character, context, and Gore/Bush digressions, but it fumbles the game: erratic pacing and odd inclusions.

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Twitter Review: Moon

The sci-fi of ‘Moon’ is philosophical, humane, rigorous, and austere, and I adore the robot’s hopeful emoticon expressions; that feels right

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cache-4.jpgIn his “Great Movies” article on Caché, Roger Ebert teases that he found a key to understanding this ever-mysterious movie:

“How is it possible to watch a thriller intently two times and completely miss a smoking gun that’s in full view? Yet I did. Only on my third trip through Michael Haneke’s Caché did I consciously observe a shot which forced me to redefine the film.”

Great! In my single viewing, I was frustrated by the film; I enjoyed its coy, cryptic nature but still don’t get its critical reputation.

Ebert provides the following hint:

“Now I call your attention to the shot I missed the first time through. You will find it on the DVD, centering around 20:39. You tell me what it means. It’s the smoking gun, but did it shoot anybody?”

The trouble is that with different DVD versions in different countries, and with different DVD players, the 20:39 mark might fall on a different shot. I’m guessing that the “smoking gun” in question comes before the dinner party, but beyond that ... .

‘Anvil!’ merely repeats Spinal Tap’s satire and has too much Lips and too little Robb, but the duo’s determination is touching and truly sad

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After watching ‘Paranormal Activity,’ our smoke alarms sounded at irregular intervals throughout the night. Why are my keys on the floor?

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Creepy but generic, an otherwise austere ‘Paranormal Activity’ would have unsettled more sans the extra-diegetic rumble conditioning viewers

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‘Crash’ is the dead horse that still gallops. Most of what’s here says more about the haters than the film: Link

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I love the elegant subversion of history in ‘Inglourious Basterds,’ how the Basterds themselves are MacGuffins, and QT’s endless patience.

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